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Ghana’s coronavirus cases hit 6,269, recoveries now 1,898

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This makes the total confirmed cases of the novel Coronavirus stand at 6,269, according to the latest update by the Ghana Health Service (GHS).

The increase, per the GHS update, is attributed to new cases found in Greater Accra, Ashanti, Western and Central regions.

The update also indicated 125 more recoveries, raising the number of recoveries to 1,898.

As of Wednesday night [May 20, 2020], the number of deaths remains at 31.

The total active Coronavirus cases is now at 4,340.

Eight persons are still in critical condition with the number of tests administered in the region of 187,000.

The Greater Accra region still leads with 4,582 confirmed cases, followed by the Ashanti region with 921 cases.

The cases in the Western and Central regions have now increased to 170 and 285 respectively.

So far, the Savannah, Ahafo and Bono East regions have not recorded any case of the virus.

Find below the regional breakdown

Greater Accra Region – 4,582

Ashanti Region – 921

Central Region – 285

Western Region – 170

Eastern Region – 106

Western North Region – 57

Volta Region – 41

Northern Region – 31

Oti Region – 26

Upper East Region – 26

Upper West Region – 21

North East Region – 2

Bono Region – 1

Savannah Region – 0

Ahafo Region – 0

Bono East Region – 0

 

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Breaking News : Rev. Obofour APC church building in Kumasi collapses (Video)

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Information reaching us indicates one of the churches of Rev. Obofour has collapsed.

The Anointed Palace Chapel church building at IPT junction in Kumasi has broken down according to Oheneba Media.

According to Oheneba Media they have sent one of their reporters to the scene but the reporter has been denied access.

Rev. Obofour church, APC church at IPT Junction in Kumasi completely destroyed . EiiiiiHow possible?Credit: Oheneba media

Publicado por MashupGh em Sábado, 6 de junho de 2020

 

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Education Bodies Bill Passed

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A legislation seeking to eliminate functional redundancies and regulate the educational sector effectively and efficiently has been passed by Parliament and is set to become law.

The Minister of Parliamentary Affairs, Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu, moved the motion for the adoption by the House on behalf of the Education Minister. It was seconded by the Member of Parliament (MP) for Wa West, Joseph Yieleh Chireh.

What Is The Education Regulatory Bodies Bill?

The Education Regulatory Bodies Bill, 2019 is made up of six parts and 127 clauses, and describes the structures of the various regulatory agencies.

They are the National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE), the National Accreditation Board (NAB), the Council for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (COTVET), the National Teaching Council (NTC), and the National Inspectorate Board (NIB).

Part one of the Act restructures and merges the existing National Council for Tertiary Education and the National Accreditation Board into one institution, to be known as the Ghana Tertiary Education Commission.

Part two has merged the Council for Technical and Vocational Education and Training, the National Board for Professional and Technician Examinations and the National Vocational Training Institute into a new body, to be known as the National Commission for Technical and Vocational Education and Training.

The third, fourth and fifth parts of the Act provide for the National Teaching Council, the National Inspectorate Authority and the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment respectively.

Part six, which is the final part of the bill, deals with the administrative and financial provisions in respect of the five regulatory bodies established under the bill.

Advantage Of The Education Regulatory Bodies Bill

The Minister of State in charge of Tertiary Education, Prof. Kwesi Yankah, during the debate on the bill, said it had no intention of rendering people redundant, and that it was coming to harmonize the consolidated bodies in order to lead to greater efficiency in the running of tertiary and other levels of education in the country.

“Various aspects of education have come under criticism. It is best understood alongside of existence of a number of documents for tertiary institutions, including the various reforms in the tertiary education sector,” he noted during the second reading by the House.

Prof. Yankah indicated that Ghanaians should bear in mind that the document (bill) had travelled a long journey to arrive in the House, adding that various stages of the journey of the document had taken care of issues raised, such as small differences and overlaps of existing documents.

Disadvantage Of The Education Regulatory Bodies Bill

He, however, pointed out that the bill was silent on the process of obtaining certification, accreditation and charter, and that this aspect of the document would rest with the regulatory body, the Ghana Tertiary Education Commission (GTEC), that will come out with specific regulations not stipulated in the bill.

On the issue of access, Prof. Yankah stated that it is one area that had confronted tertiary education in the country, and that the limitation of access all these years had been an unfortunate perception about private university.

“In all the discussions that I have heard on the floor, I get the impression that private universities are probably setting us back in terms of quality. What we often forget is that we have so many spotlights in private universities’ challenges that we intend to completely ignore the challenges faced by public universities,” he argued.

The minister said the public had not put the scale objectively on the issues, and asked rhetorically, if relevant at all, which of these two aspects of issues of education are probably running us down.

“What extend has the National Accreditation Board spotlighted public universities and raised issues that we normally see about private universities?” he quizzed and continued that nobody talks about student-lecturer ratio at public universities which is clearly a function of NAB.

“But when a private university faulted in one way or the other it is natural that we are all up in arms because of the perception that private universities are substandard,” he added.

The Minister of Parliamentary Affairs, Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu, moved the motion for the adoption by the House on behalf of the Education Minister. It was seconded by the Member of Parliament (MP) for Wa West, Joseph Yieleh Chireh.

Structures Of The Various Regulatory Agencies

The Education Regulatory Bodies Bill, 2019 is made up of six parts and 127 clauses, and describes the structures of the various regulatory agencies.

They are the National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE), the National Accreditation Board (NAB), the Council for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (COTVET), the National Teaching Council (NTC), and the National Inspectorate Board (NIB).

Part one of the Act restructures and merges the existing National Council for Tertiary Education and the National Accreditation Board into one institution, to be known as the Ghana Tertiary Education Commission.

Part two has merged the Council for Technical and Vocational Education and Training, the National Board for Professional and Technician Examinations and the National Vocational Training Institute into a new body, to be known as the National Commission for Technical and Vocational Education and Training.

The third, fourth and fifth parts of the Act provide for the National Teaching Council, the National Inspectorate Authority and the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment respectively.

Part six, which is the final part of the bill, deals with the administrative and financial provisions in respect of the five regulatory bodies established under the bill.

The Minister of State in charge of Tertiary Education, Prof. Kwesi Yankah, during the debate on the bill, said it had no intention of rendering people redundant, and that it was coming to harmonize the consolidated bodies in order to lead to greater efficiency in the running of tertiary and other levels of education in the country.

“Various aspects of education have come under criticism. It is best understood alongside of existence of a number of documents for tertiary institutions, including the various reforms in the tertiary education sector,” he noted during the second reading by the House.

Prof. Yankah indicated that Ghanaians should bear in mind that the document (bill) had travelled a long journey to arrive in the House, adding that various stages of the journey of the document had taken care of issues raised, such as small differences and overlaps of existing documents.

He, however, pointed out that the bill was silent on the process of obtaining certification, accreditation and charter, and that this aspect of the document would rest with the regulatory body, the Ghana Tertiary Education Commission (GTEC), that will come out with specific regulations not stipulated in the bill.

On the issue of access, Prof. Yankah stated that it is one area that had confronted tertiary education in the country, and that the limitation of access all these years had been an unfortunate perception about private university.

“In all the discussions that I have heard on the floor, I get the impression that private universities are probably setting us back in terms of quality. What we often forget is that we have so many spotlights in private universities’ challenges that we intend to completely ignore the challenges faced by public universities,” he argued.

The minister said the public had not put the scale objectively on the issues, and asked rhetorically, if relevant at all, which of these two aspects of issues of education are probably running us down.

“What extend has the National Accreditation Board spotlighted public universities and raised issues that we normally see about private universities?” he quizzed and continued that nobody talks about student-lecturer ratio at public universities which is clearly a function of NAB.

“But when a private university faulted in one way or the other it is natural that we are all up in arms because of the perception that private universities are substandard,” he added.

Source: CediNews

 

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41 Ghanaians in USA arrive in Ghana

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41 Ghanaians who were in Washington DC, USA, have arrived in safely in Ghana.

41 Ghanaians who are mostly students who went on an exchange program sponsored by the State Department of the United States of America have arrived safely back home.

They arrived aboard a South African Airways flight at 9.20 am today, Saturday, at the Kotoko International Airport, Citinewsroom.com reported.

This comes a day after the government announced that it has arranged chartered flights to bring back Ghanaians home based on a schedule drawn up by the Foreign Affairs Ministry even though most countries have closed borders due to COVID-19.

The evacuees are lodging at a hotel in Accra, and they are to observe the two-weeks mandatory quarantine period.

One of the students who spoke to Citi News said, “The exchange program was supposed to be for ten months. So we were supposed to come back on June 8. But we left our various states on June 3 and then we went to the USA to stay overnight and then we left.”

Source: Citinewsroom.com

 

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